Original Research

Customer satisfaction with last-mile delivery in Kenya: An online customer perspective

Eric Mogire, Peter J. Kilbourn, Rose Luke
Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management | Vol 17 | a844 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jtscm.v17i0.844 | © 2023 Eric Mogire, Peter J. Kilbourn, Rose Luke | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 September 2022 | Published: 28 February 2023

About the author(s)

Eric Mogire, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, Kenya
Peter J. Kilbourn, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Rose Luke, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: An effective and efficient last-mile delivery service plays a critical role towards the growth of global online retail sales. In Kenya, online customers have often been unwilling to shop online again, mainly because of delivery issues. However, the extent to which customers are satisfied with the last-mile delivery service remains unknown. This is despite the significant potential that the sector has, which remains unrealised in the country’s economy.

Objectives: The key objective of this study was to establish the extent of customer satisfaction with the different elements of last-mile delivery service offered by online retailers in Kenya.

Method: A quantitative approach was utilised. An online survey collected data from 467 online customers (‘users’ and ‘nonusers’) in Nairobi. The data were subjected to descriptive statistics and the mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine the outcome of the study.

Results:Users’ were most satisfied with delivery options while ‘nonusers’ were most satisfied with delivery fees. However, both ‘users’ and ‘nonusers’ were least satisfied with returns. This study also found that ‘users’ were more satisfied with delivery options, delivery tracking and returns compared with ‘nonusers’. There was a significant difference in satisfaction with delivery options for ‘users’ and ‘nonusers’.

Conclusion: Online retail managers are advised to improve the way in which they offer returns to their customers. This involves offering more options for returning the ordered goods, making it easy to locate the returns procedure on their websites and having a clear returns policy.

Contribution: This study advances the understanding of last-mile delivery service, after comprehensive empirical evidence of customer satisfaction with the different elements of last-mile delivery service in Kenya.


Keywords

Customer satisfaction; service quality; last-mile delivery; order fulfilment; online retail

JEL Codes

C83: Survey Methods • Sampling Methods

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure

Metrics

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