Original Research

Logistics management skills development: A Zimbabwean case

Jacobus N. Cronjé
Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management | Vol 9, No 1 | a161 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jtscm.v9i1.161 | © 2015 Jacobus N. Cronjé | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 02 September 2014 | Published: 04 February 2015

About the author(s)

Jacobus N. Cronjé, Department of Transport Economics and Logistics Management, North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Since logistics emerged as an applied discipline during the latter part of the 20th century, there has been an increased need for skills development in logistics and supply chain management. However, literature suggests a general shortage of educated and skilled logistics and supply chain managers worldwide.

Objectives: The purpose of this article was to benchmark an in-house training programme in logistics management in the beverage industry of Zimbabwe with international best practice.

Method: A case study approach was followed focusing on the programme curriculum, content and delivery. The article reports on the nature and effectiveness of the programme. The curriculum was benchmarked with skills requirements identified in literature. Relevance was evaluated based on participant perceptions over a period of 3 years using questionnaires with both closed- and open-ended questions.

Results: Findings suggested that the programme offering is in line with international practice whilst it also addresses particular issues in Third World countries. Participants perceived the programme as being practical and valuable for enhancing their job performance and career development.

Conclusion: The article provides a framework for evaluating logistics training programmes. Future research could include an evaluation that measures changes in on-the-job behaviour of participants.


Keywords

Logistics management; Supply chain management; Skills development; Logistics skills requirements; In-house training; Programme evaluation; Human resource development

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