Original Research

Travel mode choices of residents in developing cities: A case study of Lusaka, Zambia

Moses Mwale, Noleen Pisa, Rose Luke
Journal of Transport and Supply Chain Management | Vol 18 | a1005 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jtscm.v18i0.1005 | © 2024 Moses Mwale, Noleen Pisa, Rose Luke | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 December 2023 | Published: 05 July 2024

About the author(s)

Moses Mwale, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Noleen Pisa, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Rose Luke, Department of Transport and Supply Chain Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: As urban populations rapidly expand across sub-Saharan Africa, promoting sustainable and efficient transportation systems is imperative for fostering economic growth and social inclusion by enhancing mobility and accessibility.

Objectives: This study examines the travel mode choices and factors influencing the use of these modes among residents of Lusaka, Zambia, for their work or school trips.

Method: A household survey ascertained mode choice, trip characteristics, and transportation challenges experienced. Descriptive, contingency table, and post hoc analyses explored relationships between mode and associated factors.

Results: Public buses emerged as the predominant mode for work/school trips, followed by walking and private cars, highlighting public transit’s and non-motorised transport’s importance. However, travel behaviour varied significantly by residential density. High-density areas favoured public transit and walking, while low-density areas promoted greater private vehicle use, highlighting the influence of urban form on mode choice. Key mode choice factors included travel time, fares and safety, though environmental concerns had lesser impact. Crucially, socio-economic and demographic characteristics like age, gender, income, education, employment, car ownership, trip purpose, household composition, presence of children, and destination accessibility significantly influenced mode choices, revealing the complex interplay shaping mobility patterns.

Conclusion: Findings underscore the need for policy interventions investing in public transportation infrastructure, enhancing pedestrian and cycling facilities, and prioritising walkability in urban planning to encourage sustainable transportation behaviours.

Contribution: This study contributes to the discourse on urban sustainability by highlighting the importance of integrating social, economic, and environmental considerations into transportation planning and policymaking processes.


Keywords

travel behaviour; travel mode share; mode selection; sustainable transportation; commuting trips; developing cities

JEL Codes

L91: Transportation: General; R00: General

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 11: Sustainable cities and communities

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